House built for a widowed mother and her child in Anuradhapura


19 Jun 2016 By Edwards Foundation
Photo of the honourable speaker at the house handover ceremony.

Edwards Foundation is celebrating after successfully completing a project to build a house in Anuradhapura for a widowed mother and her child.

We are honoured to have had the Honourable Speaker of Parliament at the official handover and house blessing ceremony.

Mr and Mrs Edwards had hoped to attend the ceremony but were regrettably unable to, due to an illness in the family. They did, however, express their joy for the occasion, noting that, to be able to complete and hand over the house is such a great achievement.

Mr and Mrs Edwards hope to continue on the philanthropic path in future, as it is a very worthwhile cause.

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Punya Edwards donates Rs 1 Million to Surya Foundation


31 Jan 2016 By Edwards Foundation
Photo of Punya Edwards meeting with the patron of Surya Foundation, Hon. Karu Jayasuriya.

Punya Edwards is proud to be able to share her success with a charity that is making a tangible impact on so many people’s lives, and in such an important way as to provide them with the security of having a place to call home.

In keeping with the core focuss of the Surya Foundation, the Rs 1 Million donation will help the foundation continue its ambitious efforts towards developing housing for the poor. Punya Edwards believes that improving the life chances of disadvantaged people is absolutely crucial to the long term future of local communities and Sri Lanka as a whole.

Selfless, community-minded individuals like Punya Edwards are an inspiration to people of all ages and future generations, and this act of generosity shows how passionate and committed the Edwards are about making a difference in the community.

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Rienzie Edwards, Proud Patron of St Anthony's Church Soup Kitchen in Kochchikade, Colombo


30 Nov 2015 By Edwards Foundation
Photo of the enjoying a healthy meal at St Anthonys Shrine in Kochchikade.

Rienzie Edwards is a proud patron of St Anthony's Shrine soup kitchen, which provides a vital lifeline of daily nutrition, friendship and a future to the most disadvantaged, homeless and vulnerable in Kochchikade and the general Colombo area.

St Anthony's Shrine has long been a retreat for society, and aside from the soup kitchen services, like many churches, has a rich program which includes Holy Mass, Confession, Counselling, Scholarships, and a host of events- all conducted in a variety of languages, including, Sinhala, Tamil and English.

The church’s work is made possible through the generous support of devotees, volunteers and sponsors like Rienzie Edwards. This support and dedication has helped the church move from strength to strength.

St. Anthony has many devotees and several Churches have been erected in his honor, with Kochikade, perhaps being one of the most popular, attracting a congregation of every cast, creed and race.

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In recognition of a loyal employee's service...


21 Aug 2015 By Edwards Foundation
Photo showing Somapala at his new house.

Although there are endless ways to recognize employees, with a sincere thank you for a job well done being common practice, we thought we ought to give our loyal recently retired house keeper a more profound thank-you, so we set out to build him a home he can retire to comfortably.

Somapala has been working with us for ten years now, and he is the humblest person you’ll ever meet. He was always there when we need him, and he was trustworthy and noble. It is our sincerest hope that this modest gesture will show him our appreciation for his service, and bring him the calmness that is needed during retirement.

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Construction of a Nunnery at Pothuhera, Kurunegala‏


16 Aug 2015 By Edwards Foundation
Photo showing a ceremony at the Nunnery.

We are honoured to have recently completed the construction of a nunnery that will accommodate up to a dozen nuns. The nunnery is located in Pothuhera, a small town in the district of Kurunegala. The nunnery will serve as a residence for nuns so they can better serve the Pothuhera community, which has a population of nearly forty thousand people.

Nuns perform a host of duties within communities, working in areas like education, medicine and social work. All jobs that nuns perform, in some way, are meant to fulfil their overarching roles in faith. Nuns fulfil the roles of caregivers and humanitarians, offering services to many that are need; are these are services that sometimes businesses and government are unable to efficiently offer. These roles are often tough and require the sort of commitment that can only come from the belief in serving a higher power.

The many roles that are played by nuns include feeding the poor and hungry, volunteering in nurseries and helping to build programs and housing for the poor. Additionally, nuns offer counselling for young mothers and other women seeking spiritual advice. Whether in hospitals or at nunneries, nuns often care for the sick and pray for healing. Each nunnery tries to better their community in unique ways to reflect the charity that faith teaches us.

The project cost a total of Rs 5 Million, which is a worthy investment to help ensure that the nuns will build a strong centre-point to serve the community for many years to come.

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Commissioned Building a Stupa at Werawella Temple


16 Aug 2015 By Edwards Foundation
Photo showing a ceremony at the Stupa commissioned by the Edwards.

Stupas play a central role in Buddhist belief; they symbolically represent the five elements of life, i.e. earth, air, water, fire and space. Dissecting the architecture, the ground square base is the representation of earth, the large canopy represents the air, the round dome represents water, the cone shape of the stupa represents fire, and the volume of the stupa represents space.

To build a stupa, transmission, a custom in which a person is established as a successor in a lineage of teachers, and ceremonies from a Buddhist teacher is necessary. Which kind of Stupa to be constructed in a certain area is decided together with the teacher assisting in the construction. Sometimes the type of stupa chosen is directly connected with events that have taken place in the area.

Building a stupa is viewed tremendously positively, leaving very positive karmic imprints in the mind, and is also very important as a place of meditation.

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The value of Tiger Conservation


11 Aug 2015 By Edwards Foundation

The first time we laid eyes on a Royal Bengal Tiger was on cold November morning in 2011; the 24th of November to be precise. This was on the last day of a safari at Ranthambore Tiger Reserve in India, a day filled with anxiety as tracking the tiger had proven fruitless on 8 jungle drives spanning 3 days.

I distinctly remember the tiger we saw; T-24 was a sight to behold! He was a huge majestic tiger that steadily gazed at us as if peering deep into our souls. No syllables can express the feeling; we instantly fell in love with tigers.

The following summer in August 2012, we were at the reserve, and this time we had much better luck, seeing three tigers, T-6, T-25 and Machili, the pride of Ranthambore Tiger Reserve.

We were, and still are truly in love with tigers, and in awe of the great work that conservationist do under tough circumstances. It was our sincere hope that we could do whatever we can to extend a helping hand towards conservation works. Our guide, Mazar Khan, was very helpful in helping us map out plans of how we can help. With the grace of God, we hoped to make a donation of 300 pairs of boots and four motorbikes to the forest guards during our next visit in October of 2012.

‘Tiger tourism’ is not without its controversies, with some arguing for and some against it. But with population of as little as 3000 wild tigers left in the world, the future for this majestic species is under severe threat, and it is time for less argument and more action. The decline of this species stems from many issues, including human encroachment on its habitat, and the misinformed beliefs that place value on dead tigers. On the Indian subcontinent, where the largest tiger population perseveres, only 11 percent of the original tiger habitat remains, albeit in a fragmented and degraded state. Tigers are a conservation dependent species, and tourism is well suited to bring the much needed funds to ensure that vital conservation work continues and is reinforced.

Image source: The Island >> On the trail of the Tiger!

The decline of the tiger can be reversed, but everyone must take it upon themselves to become an ambassador for this species or any other species under threat. We certainly hope that we are living up to this creed, and indeed are playing a role in creating awareness for the challenges faced by the Bengal Tiger, which is close to extinction.

Credit: A version of this article first appeared on The Island

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Helping Glennie's Home Orphanage in former war torn Trincomalee‏


07 Jun 2015 By Edwards Foundation

Glennie Home Trincomalee was started by Rev. Fr. Leo in 1992 has about 18 orphan children both boys and girls which has now grown to over 50. They are between the ages 5 and 18. Rev. Sister Adriane and a team of volunteer workers help Fr. Leo to run the administration of the house.

These children need not only formal education during their formative years but they should also be prepared to face challenges of their future life as adults. This means that they needed a Vocational Training Centre for these children to lift up their lives.

The Centre is equipped with a computer, three typewriters and three sewing machines. It is now for use not only for the children at the orphanage but also for poor youth in the area willing uplift their living standards.

We visited the home and provided them provisions, and furniture. We also assisted them with a new wing to the existing building, which has greatly improved the lives of the Children.

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Meeting with the Most Venerable Malwatte Mahanayaka Thero


07 Jun 2015 By Edwards Foundation

The Malwatte Chief Prelate Thibbatuwawe Sri Siddhartha Sumangala Thero was kind enough to grant us an audience to discuss the social and religious upliftment work we were planning and how to make improvements. He is the head of one of the Nikaya’s and is respected as an outspoken person with strong principles and beliefs.

Appointment of senior Buddhist monks to the Mahanayaka position in Malwatte Chapter in Sri Lanka also began with the re-establishment of Upasampada (higher ordination in 1753) on the initiatives taken by Sangharaja Weliwita Sri Saranankara Thero during the reign of king Kirti Sri Rajasinha of Kandy. Since then this tradition has continued up to date.

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Prithipura Disabled Communities


28 May 2015 By Edwards Foundation

Prithipura Communities is a Sri Lankan organisation dedicated to the care and assistance of children with disabilities. The organisation's philosophy is to provide a loving and caring environment, which allows the best possible avenues for the children's growth and development.

The people who call the community home are mostly infants, children and young adults, although some residents are much older.

Those who arrive at the community as children have often been abandoned by their parents and consequently have very little hope of returning to society after rehabilitation, education and training. For them, the Prithipura Communities is home.

The care and education that the community provides, as well as the internal job opportunities that are at their four branches offer the children the possibility of growing up in a healthy and loving environment, developing, skills and engaging in meaningful work.

The organization currently accomodates 250 residents accross its four location and relies on donations and sponsorships to run. You are encouraged to donate and help in Prithipura's extraordinary efforts.

Source: Prithipura

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Meeting the Most Venerable Mahanayaka of Amarapura‏


27 May 2015 By Edwards Foundation

We had the good fortune of meeting with the Most Ven. Udugama Sri Buddharakkitha Thero - Former Mahanayaka of the Asgiriya Chapter of Siyam Nikaya, who was much impressed with the good work we were doing for the propagation of religion and thereby helping to build a crime free righteous society.

In Sri Lankan Buddhist tradition, the title Mahanayaka is held by the heads of the chapters of all three main sects, Siam Nikaya (Estd. 1753), Amarapura Nikaya (Estd. 1803) and Ramanna Nikaya (Estd. 1864). Appointment of senior Buddhist monks to the Mahanayaka position in Sri Lanka began with the re-establishment of Upasampada (higher ordination in 1753) on the initiatives taken by Sangharaja Weliwita Sri Saranankara Thero during the reign of king Kirti Sri Rajasinha of Kandy.

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Giving Alms to Monks at the Holy and Historic Temple of the Tooth Relic in Kandy‏


25 May 2015 By Edwards Foundation

Giving alms to monks is considered one of the three elements of the path of practice as formulated by the Buddha for laypeople dāna, sīla, bhāvanā. One rarely gets a chance to give alms at the Sri Dalada Maligawa or the Temple of the Sacred Tooth Relic. The Temple of the tooth relic is a Buddhist temple in the city of Kandy, Sri Lanka. It is located in the royal palace complex of the former Kingdom of Kandy, which houses the relic of the tooth of Lord Buddha. It’s a blessings to be able to do this dana inside the Temple of the Tooth Relic.

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Should we eat meat?


24 May 2015 By Edwards Foundation

I recently read a great a great article on the Gate Notes website in which the author shares his take on Vaclav Smil's book titled "Should We Eat Meat?".

In the article, the author looks at some of the problems that arise from meat consumption;

Raising animals can take a big toll on the environment. You have to feed the animal far more calories than you extract when you eat it. It’s especially problematic as we convert large swaths of land from crops that feed people to crops that feed cows and pigs. Plus clearing forests to make more farmland contributes to climate change, as do the greenhouse gases produced by all those animals.

and

The richer the world gets, the more meat it eats; the more meat it eats, the bigger the threat to the planet. How do we square this circle?

Meat eating is often a contentious subject, whether considering the technical, ethical, environmental, political, or health-related aspects of production and consumption.

This book is a wide-ranging and interdisciplinary examination and critique of meat consumption by humans, throughout their evolution and around the world. Setting the scene with a chapter on meat’s role in human evolution and its growing influence during the development of agricultural practices, the book goes on to examine modern production systems, their efficiencies, outputs, and impacts. The major global trends of meat consumption are described in order to find out what part its consumption plays in changing modern diets in countries around the world. The heart of the book addresses the consequences of the “massive carnivory” of western diets, looking at the inefficiencies of production and at the huge impacts on land, water, and the atmosphere. Health impacts are also covered, both positive and negative. In conclusion, the author looks forward at his vision of “rational meat eating”, where environmental and health impacts are reduced, animals are treated more humanely, and alternative sources of protein make a higher contribution.

Should We Eat Meat ? is not an ideological tract for or against carnivorousness but rather a careful evaluation of meat’s roles in human diets and the environmental and health consequences of its production and consumption. It will be of interest to a wide readership including professionals and academics in food and agricultural production, human health and nutrition, environmental science, and regulatory and policy making bodies around the world.

Sources: Gates Notes and Vaclav Smil

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Ray of Hope Sri Lanka


15 May 2015 By Edwards Foundation

This is not a photo we downloaded from the Internet guys! He is for real. This puppy is in Sri Lanka. This innocent wee baby was born without the front limbs. He is currently with his momma in Peta - Colombo.

This unlucky baby's all other siblings are healthy and are normal except him. The concerned family feeding this stray family contacted us with the hope of finding him a loving and caring family that can look after him. They are worried as if to how he would survive on the road in this condition and honestly - so are we!

Destiny has been really unkind to him. But we want to make him realize that he is not abnormal, defected, unlucky or weird but a very very special boy that tons and tons of people love and adore!

We have a kind lady willing to foster him but that is not the solution to this problem. He needs a permanent home that will look after him with patience and special attention.

We are requesting from all our fans to please post - post and cross post this post. We NEED to HURRY and find him a FOREVER home.

Please call Iraki on 0777410017 or Nirmali on 0777314727 if you are seriously interested in giving him a home. No false promises please as this will be a 10 - 14 years of commitment.

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Animals rescued from slaughter


08 May 2015 By Edwards Foundation
Mr and Mrs Edwards with one of the cows saved from a slaughter.

You may recall that there recently was a huge outcry and global condemnation following the Gadhimai Hindu festival in Nepal which saw the slaughter of thousands of animals that included more than 5000 buffaloes and other farm animals like chickens, goats and pigs. This is thought to be the world’s largest animal sacrifice ritual, with devotees believing the event brings good luck and encourages Gadhimai, the Hindu goddess of power, to answer their wishes.

The sights and sounds at the festival, as you can imagine, are said to be are haunting. Witnesses report pools of blood, animals bellowing in pain and panic, wide-eyed children looking on, devotees covered in animal blood, and some people even drinking blood from the headless but still warm carcasses!

Several charities and animal welfare groups have worked hard to stop this slaughter that occurs every five years. It is estimated that in 2009, 200,000 animals and birds were slaughtered, and this year, the number killed is estimated to be 500,000! The only success that these groups had recently achieved was in pressuring the Indian Government into stopping animals being transported across the border, as a sizable number of animals are bought from there; this in spite several Hindu leaders arguing that the ritual goes against core religious beliefs.

There however is some good news as, in a victory for activists, Nepalese temple authorities have recently announced that they will end this centuries-old tradition of mass animal slaughter that attracts hundreds of thousands of worshippers.

The issue of saving animals from slaughter strikes a chord with us as we recently rescued some cattle from an abattoir. These cattle will be provided with a safe and peaceful environment where they can remain for the rest of their lives. Veterinary care and medication will be provided and the animals will be monitored to ensure their good health and wellbeing.

Picking up the animals from the abattoir was a very sad experience, as upon offloading them the trucks, it seemed as though they were aware of the fate that awaited them; one of the animals knelt on its front legs and twisted its neck as if succumbing to defeat- except of course, they were the lucky ones, the chosen ones, that alas, will live out the rest of their days enjoying green pastures.

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Gifting land to build temples


16 Apr 2015 By Edwards Foundation

We gifted lands owned by us to the temple to build a retirement home for retired and sick monks in the beautiful and Historic City of Anuradhapura. Anuradhapura is one of the ancient capitals of Sri Lanka, famous for its well-preserved ruins of ancient Sri Lankan civilization. It was the center of Theravada Buddhism for many centuries. It is believed that from the 4th century BC, it was the capital of the Sinhalese until the beginning of the 11th century AD.

The Gifting was done in the presence of the Diyawadana Nilame of the Temple of the tooth relic who also presented us an award for this meritorious deed. Diyawadana Nilame is the office of chief lay custodian of Temple of the Tooth, Kandy, Sri Lanka. It remains a prestigious position, enriched with over two thousand years of history to safeguard and carry out ancient rituals for the most sacred Relic of the tooth of the Buddha. Diyawadana Nilame has the responsibility of overseeing of all aspects of the Sri Dalada Maligawa. As such it was a ceremony steeped in tradition and history.

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Receiving an award from the Diyawadana Nilame Dela Bandara


16 Apr 2013 By Edwards Foundation

Today was special day as it started with a 'Kiri Puja' to the Holy Tooth Relic at the Dalada Maligawa where we gifted a piece of land in Anuradhapura to the Temple. It is a very unique piece of land on the banks of Thisawewa with scenery that includes three stupas. I was honoured to receive an award from the Diyawadana Nilame Dela Bandara, and then visited and received the blessings from the Chief Priests at Malwatte as well as Asgiriya. In the evening we had a Piritha inside the Maligawa with a Gilan Passa puja attended by the Asgiriya Chief Priest.This is one of the lovliest Aluth Avuruddu's I have celebrated.

Diyawadana Nilame is the office of chief lay custodian of Temple of the Tooth, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Formerly an office of the Royal household, today it remains a prestigious position, enriched with over two thousand years of history to safeguard and carry out ancient rituals for the most sacred Relic of the tooth of the Buddha. Diyawadana Nilame has the responsibility of overseeing of all aspects of the Sri Dalada Maligawa. He has the traditional duty of organizing the annual pageant, the Kandy Esala Perahera. The current Diyawadana Nilame is Pradeep Nilanga Dela.

Prior to 1815, during the Kandyian monarchy, the Diyawadana Nilame was a minister of the royal court tasked with supplying the King with water and carrying out the ancient rituals to ensure rain during correct seasons. This duty is still carried out by the Diyawadana Nilame for the most sacred Relic of the tooth of the Buddha, marked by the water cutting ceremony on the final day of the Esala Perahera.

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Helping pregnant and destitute mothers


31 Jan 2013 By Edwards Foundation

A little help goes a long way for pregnant and destitute mothers.

Not so long ago, my wife and I helped construct a nunnery so nuns can have better outreach programs in the community.

For 2012-2013 New Year celebrations, we held a special thanks-giving ceremony at the nunnery. The event included donating food and medical supplies to widowed and destitute women.

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The joy of giving


01 Aug 2012 By Edwards Foundation

Generosity is central to faith, and by exploring it together we find joy and pursue a life of purpose. Nobody can tell you how to be generous, and indeed, the size of a generous gesture does not matter. There is simply no act too small or too big, but simply a right act from a sincere heart.

My wife and I have something of a birthday tradition; We view birthdays as special occasions where one has an opportunity to celebrate life and extend goodwill towards others.

In keeping with this tradition, this year, we embarked upon a 7 Day Kiri, Aloka and Kapruka Pooja at Jayasri Maha Bodhi at the end of which we distributed dry rations to 500 families and school books to 200 destitute children. One cannot express the heart-felt joy of touching another person’s life. . A sacred Boo tree was also planted in Wakada, Kurunegala to mark my wife’s birthday, but the present she was most pleased with was the laying of a foundation stone for a new temple that will include a hostel for female monks, a chaitya, and a bana maduwa (a place where tiie Buddhist Priests read the Bana, or Sacred Books).

Gifting such as this offers much needed sustenance to rural communities in Sri Lanka as poverty continues to be a large problem. Although Sri Lanka has done well in some Human Development Index (HDI) indicators such as life expectancy and literacy, and even topping some rankings in the South Asia region, it has continued to average in the medium ranges of the HDI. This is despite the fact that Sri Lanka has been experiencing moderate growth in its GDP averaging 5.5% per annum between 2006 and 2009. One of the reasons is due to its relatively low GDP per capita; currently ranked in the bottom one third of the world. This could be due to the issue of poverty, specifically, rural poverty. The Sri Lankan government has been successful in reducing poverty from 15.2% in 2006 to 8.9% in 2010, Urban poverty was reduced from 6.7 to 5.3% while rural poverty was reduced from 15.7 to 9.5% and the nation is close to achieving Millennium Development Goals on Eradicating extreme poverty hunger.

Image: Copy of an article that appeared in The Island newspaper.

Promoting charitable giving is a wonderful way to share happiness and spread values such as generosity and compassion through the community and ultimately build a better world. Generosity comes from the heart, and is also a thoughtful process that guides our philanthropic choices and role in making our community a better place.

Source: UNDP, The Island

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Commission of construction of Buddha's statue in Aranya


20 Jul 2011 By Edwards Foundation

For my wife's birthday this year, we commissioned the construction of a 24 foot Buddha statue in atop a mountain in the mountain section of the Aranya Monastery. It takes nearly 2 hours to to reach the top of the mountain as it is not vehicle accessible.

Na Uyana Aranya (‘Ironwood Grove Forest Monastery’) is one of the oldest Buddhist forest monasteries in Sri Lanka, dating back to the time of King Uttiya (3rd Century BCE). The modern revival of this ancient monastery during the past few decades has seen its emergence as one of the main meditation centres in the country. Today it is again a home to a thriving community of monastic and lay Buddhist practitioners.

Na Uyana Forest Monastery covers a total of more than 5000 acres, which can be divided into 4 main sections: (1) Pansiyagama Section, (2) Mountain Section, (3) Matale Section and (4) Andagala Section. The Pansiyagama Section is situated within an Ironwood forest, and contains the following structures: an uposatha hall (Sīmā Sālā), a meditation hall (Bhāvanā Sālā), a dininghall (Dāna Sālā) and alms food hall (Pinḍapāta Sālā), a library and offices, in addition to about 80 kuṭis (monks residences). The ′ Mountain Section is the newly developed area on the main hill of the monastery, which has about 80 kuṭis and includes a meditation hall and service hall (Upaṭṭhāna Sālā). This area is in the process of being reforested. The Matale Section has about 20 kuṭis and includes a meditation hall, a dining-hall and an alms food hall. It is situated among grassy hills on the eastern side of the monastery. The Andagala Section is a remote, densely forested area, situated in the north-eastern part of the monastery.

Source: Na Uyana Aranya

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Commission of construction of Buddha's statue in Aranya


20 Jul 2011 By Edwards Foundation

For my wife's birthday this year, we commissioned the construction of a 24 foot Buddha statue in atop a mountain in the mountain section of the Aranya Monastery. It takes nearly 2 hours to to reach the top of the mountain as it is not vehicle accessible.

Na Uyana Aranya (‘Ironwood Grove Forest Monastery’) is one of the oldest Buddhist forest monasteries in Sri Lanka, dating back to the time of King Uttiya (3rd Century BCE). The modern revival of this ancient monastery during the past few decades has seen its emergence as one of the main meditation centres in the country. Today it is again a home to a thriving community of monastic and lay Buddhist practitioners.

Na Uyana Forest Monastery covers a total of more than 5000 acres, which can be divided into 4 main sections: (1) Pansiyagama Section, (2) Mountain Section, (3) Matale Section and (4) Andagala Section. The Pansiyagama Section is situated within an Ironwood forest, and contains the following structures: an uposatha hall (Sīmā Sālā), a meditation hall (Bhāvanā Sālā), a dininghall (Dāna Sālā) and alms food hall (Pinḍapāta Sālā), a library and offices, in addition to about 80 kuṭis (monks residences). The ′ Mountain Section is the newly developed area on the main hill of the monastery, which has about 80 kuṭis and includes a meditation hall and service hall (Upaṭṭhāna Sālā). This area is in the process of being reforested. The Matale Section has about 20 kuṭis and includes a meditation hall, a dining-hall and an alms food hall. It is situated among grassy hills on the eastern side of the monastery. The Andagala Section is a remote, densely forested area, situated in the north-eastern part of the monastery.

Source: Na Uyana Aranya

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Celebrating the opening of a new Temple in Kurunegala


31 Jan 2011 By Edwards Foundation

We are happy to have successfuly completed the construction of a temple at our plantation in Kurunegala. The local population is largely Bhuddhist and this is very much needed so as to better serve the community. They have no proper temple to worship in. So My Hubby and I built a temple in Kurunegala. The Dharmashala was opened on the 23rd of January, and we can't wait for it to get into regular use.

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Commissioned Building of a 'Dharmsala' (Lecture Hall) at Werawella Temple in Kurunegala


02 Jan 2011 By Edwards Foundation
Photo showing a Dharmsala commissioned by the Edwards.

The giving of alms and offerings is a key feature of most religions. As a matter of fact, I am not aware of any religion that does not have this concept, and it is encouraged as an act of charity toward those less fortunate. In Buddhism, the core belief is that there are eight big offerings referred to as the 'Ata Maha Kusal', or Great Meritorious deeds. Building Buddhist places of worship and congregation is one.

According to the teachings of the Buddha, building a temple is one of the Eight Great Meritorious deeds that generate merit every minute of the day during this life and many future lives until we reach Nibbana, or Nirvana, which is the goal of a Buddhist path. You are regarded as enormously fortunate to able to participate in building a temple, as it is a rare opportunity that few can partake in. Building a Temple and Meditation centre is especially important as it helps spread the teachings of the Buddha far and wide, and also offers worshipers a sanctuary.

In keeping with these teachings, we built a Dharmsala at the Werawella Temple in Kurunegala. The Dharmsala is a welcome addition for spiritual pilgrims to the Werawella Temple, and has come at a time when it is very much needed.

The cost of the development came in at Rs 7.5 Million

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General

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Philanthropy

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Animal Welfare

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Economic Development

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Environment

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Disability

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Conservation

Rienzie Edwards Conservation Efforts